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What I learned from my Dad about Identity…wow he is so wrong!

  
  
  
When I was growing up my dad always told me "People make first judgments on image; have a good one." He suggested that I accurately project the image of the "real me". A person's dress, mannerisms, their speech, their friendliness, and many other items create images that last for a long, long time. That idea of you becomes your identity.

This has become more and more the reality with the inception of social media sites like Myspace and Facebook. Users have inserted so much of themselves into their pages that it goes beyond what our parents taught us about showing people who we are and have taken it a level where we have given the world more than enough information to become us. Most high tech occurrences have manifested themselves from the direct theft of the identity in combination with information from someone who knows something about you.

Advancements in online security have kept the numbers quite low and even though the attacks seem quite rampant online security analysts have continued to provide levels of security which are unmatched with any other. 43% of all identity theft is due to lost or stolen wallets and checkbooks in comparison to 11% coming from online attacks. More than 10% of victims knew their fraud perpetrator and there has been a huge decrease in identity theft via mail from the inception of electronic statements. This all sounds like it sides completely towards the benefit of using the internet even more but please use it responsibly.

Tips:
1. Set your settings on social sites to be viewed by "only friends".
2. Change your passwords every few months.
3. Search for your profile on other social network sites that may have been built without your knowledge.

 

Safe surfing!

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